Tag Archives | likeable engine

The Likeable Engine on the day Harold Ramis died.

Mumbrella looks at the Likeable Engine

Mumbrella did a great story on the Likeable Engine recently focussing on how people share news of celebrity deaths. We’re pretty sure people do not share these stories for macabre reasons. We think they’re shared to mark the moment, as a tribute to the dead star and sometimes an era they defined in some way. Check out Mumbrella’s story here.   […]

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The Likeable Engine, free for the world

We’re big on sharing our findings here at Share Wars. Yet one of the things we’ve kept to ourselves is our data-collecting beast: the Likeable Engine. The Likeable Engine tracks the social sharing of news articles from around the globe in real time. It has spent the past two years working tirelessly, scanning news websites […]

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Share counts on big stories get seriously big

The Likeable engine is up and running again, collecting stories and their share counts from around the world, and a brief look at the November shows that numbers on US sites have gone through the roof. Eighteen months ago, in our first collection period, the most shared story of the period had a sharecount (Facebook […]

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Words that share on Facebook

“Abbott backs gay marriage in Facebook update” This phantom headline is from the future or an alternate reality. If it ever did eventuate, it would share its socks off. It contains four of the most common words found in the headlines of those stories that were shared during our three-month data capture of 13 Australian […]

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5 things you didn’t know about sharing

This article is taken from a presentation Andy and Hal gave at the Walkley Storyology conference on August 8 2013. I. Cats vs dogs Everyone thinks cats rule the internet. Everyone’s wrong. We started the Share Wars project in 2011 because we believed the distribution of news through social networks was going to change news […]

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How to spot a drowning child and other sharing secrets

Share Wars is poised to run another data collection period, a year after our first one bore fruit in the form of gigabytes of data. The data collection comprises scraping the homepages of scores of news sites around the world, cataloguing the stories and asking social network APIs how those stories are sharing every few […]

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Share Wars on the road: UTS journalism school

A response to Twitter comments from UTS journalism students during our presentation on Monday, April 29, 2013.

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Marking the Moment: When it comes, the Pistorius verdict will likely be shared widely.

How priming can give you the social edge

The easy thing about working with our data is it’s retrospective. We’re neatly classifying stories that have already happened. A more difficult mission is to predict what will share in real time as stories are written and distributed through the news ecosystem. We’re working through our current crop of data with the aim of doing just that – establishing a replicable framework […]

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What the Baden-Clay saga tells us about sharing

Gerard Baden-Clay was charged with murdering his wife, Allison, after a canoeist found the dead woman next to a creek in Brisbane’s west 10 days on from her mysterious disappearance in April last year. The great-grandson of Scouts founder Lord Robert Baden-Powell reported his wife missing on April 20, telling police she had never returned from a walk the night […]

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How Share Wars categorizes stories

The first data collection period of the Share Wars project ran from March-June 2012. In that period we tracked every article published on the homepages of 118 global news sites. We tracked the articles’ share counts at regular intervals over a 24-hour period – on Facebook, Twitter and a few other social networks. In total we […]

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